Configuration examples

This section provides configuration files and tips for the following configurations:

  • Example with GitHub OAuth
  • Example with nginx reverse proxy
  • JupyterHub deployment on AWS with NGINX

Example with GitHub OAuth

In the following example, we show a configuration files for a fairly standard JupyterHub deployment with the following assumptions:

  • JupyterHub is running on a single cloud server
  • Using SSL on the standard HTTPS port 443
  • You want to use GitHub OAuth (using oauthenticator) for login
  • You need the users to exist locally on the server
  • You want users’ notebooks to be served from ~/assignments to allow users to browse for notebooks within other users home directories
  • You want the landing page for each user to be a Welcome.ipynb notebook in their assignments directory.
  • All runtime files are put into /srv/jupyterhub and log files in /var/log.

Let’s start out with jupyterhub_config.py:

# jupyterhub_config.py
c = get_config()

import os
pjoin = os.path.join

runtime_dir = os.path.join('/srv/jupyterhub')
ssl_dir = pjoin(runtime_dir, 'ssl')
if not os.path.exists(ssl_dir):
    os.makedirs(ssl_dir)


# Allows multiple single-server per user
c.JupyterHub.allow_named_servers = True

# https on :443
c.JupyterHub.port = 443
c.JupyterHub.ssl_key = pjoin(ssl_dir, 'ssl.key')
c.JupyterHub.ssl_cert = pjoin(ssl_dir, 'ssl.cert')

# put the JupyterHub cookie secret and state db
# in /var/run/jupyterhub
c.JupyterHub.cookie_secret_file = pjoin(runtime_dir, 'cookie_secret')
c.JupyterHub.db_url = pjoin(runtime_dir, 'jupyterhub.sqlite')
# or `--db=/path/to/jupyterhub.sqlite` on the command-line

# put the log file in /var/log
c.JupyterHub.extra_log_file = '/var/log/jupyterhub.log'

# use GitHub OAuthenticator for local users

c.JupyterHub.authenticator_class = 'oauthenticator.LocalGitHubOAuthenticator'
c.GitHubOAuthenticator.oauth_callback_url = os.environ['OAUTH_CALLBACK_URL']
# create system users that don't exist yet
c.LocalAuthenticator.create_system_users = True

# specify users and admin
c.Authenticator.whitelist = {'rgbkrk', 'minrk', 'jhamrick'}
c.Authenticator.admin_users = {'jhamrick', 'rgbkrk'}

# start single-user notebook servers in ~/assignments,
# with ~/assignments/Welcome.ipynb as the default landing page
# this config could also be put in
# /etc/ipython/ipython_notebook_config.py
c.Spawner.notebook_dir = '~/assignments'
c.Spawner.args = ['--NotebookApp.default_url=/notebooks/Welcome.ipynb']

Using the GitHub Authenticator [requires a few additional env variables][oauth-setup], which we will need to set when we launch the server:

export GITHUB_CLIENT_ID=github_id
export GITHUB_CLIENT_SECRET=github_secret
export OAUTH_CALLBACK_URL=https://example.com/hub/oauth_callback
export CONFIGPROXY_AUTH_TOKEN=super-secret
jupyterhub -f /path/to/aboveconfig.py

Example with nginx reverse proxy

In the following example, we show configuration files for a JupyterHub server running locally on port 8000 but accessible from the outside on the standard SSL port 443. This could be useful if the JupyterHub server machine is also hosting other domains or content on 443. The goal here is to have the following be true:

  • JupyterHub is running on a server, accessed only via HUB.DOMAIN.TLD:443
  • On the same machine, NO_HUB.DOMAIN.TLD strictly serves different content, also on port 443
  • nginx is used to manage the web servers / reverse proxy (which means that only nginx will be able to bind two servers to 443)
  • After testing, the server in question should be able to score an A+ on the Qualys SSL Labs SSL Server Test

Let’s start out with jupyterhub_config.py:

# Force the proxy to only listen to connections to 127.0.0.1
c.JupyterHub.ip = '127.0.0.1'

The nginx server config files are fairly standard fare except for the two location blocks within the HUB.DOMAIN.TLD config file:

# HTTP server to redirect all 80 traffic to SSL/HTTPS
server {
    listen 80;
    server_name HUB.DOMAIN.TLD;

    # Tell all requests to port 80 to be 302 redirected to HTTPS
    return 302 https://$host$request_uri;
}

# HTTPS server to handle JupyterHub
server {
    listen 443;
    ssl on;

    server_name HUB.DOMAIN.TLD;

    ssl_certificate /etc/letsencrypt/live/HUB.DOMAIN.TLD/fullchain.pem
    ssl_certificate_key /etc/letsencrypt/live/HUB.DOMAIN.TLD/privkey.pem

    ssl_protocols TLSv1 TLSv1.1 TLSv1.2;
    ssl_prefer_server_ciphers on;
    ssl_dhparam /etc/ssl/certs/dhparam.pem;
    ssl_ciphers 'ECDHE-RSA-AES128-GCM-SHA256:ECDHE-ECDSA-AES128-GCM-SHA256:ECDHE-RSA-AES256-GCM-SHA384:ECDHE-ECDSA-AES256-GCM-SHA384:DHE-RSA-AES128-GCM-SHA256:DHE-DSS-AES128-GCM-SHA256:kEDH+AESGCM:ECDHE-RSA-AES128-SHA256:ECDHE-ECDSA-AES128-SHA256:ECDHE-RSA-AES128-SHA:ECDHE-ECDSA-AES128-SHA:ECDHE-RSA-AES256-SHA384:ECDHE-ECDSA-AES256-SHA384:ECDHE-RSA-AES256-SHA:ECDHE-ECDSA-AES256-SHA:DHE-RSA-AES128-SHA256:DHE-RSA-AES128-SHA:DHE-DSS-AES128-SHA256:DHE-RSA-AES256-SHA256:DHE-DSS-AES256-SHA:DHE-RSA-AES256-SHA:AES128-GCM-SHA256:AES256-GCM-SHA384:AES128-SHA256:AES256-SHA256:AES128-SHA:AES256-SHA:AES:CAMELLIA:DES-CBC3-SHA:!aNULL:!eNULL:!EXPORT:!DES:!RC4:!MD5:!PSK:!aECDH:!EDH-DSS-DES-CBC3-SHA:!EDH-RSA-DES-CBC3-SHA:!KRB5-DES-CBC3-SHA';
    ssl_session_timeout 1d;
    ssl_session_cache shared:SSL:50m;
    ssl_stapling on;
    ssl_stapling_verify on;
    add_header Strict-Transport-Security max-age=15768000;

    # Managing literal requests to the JupyterHub front end
    location / {
        proxy_pass https://127.0.0.1:8000;
        proxy_set_header X-Real-IP $remote_addr;
        proxy_set_header Host $host;
        proxy_set_header X-Forwarded-For $proxy_add_x_forwarded_for;
    }

    # Managing WebHook/Socket requests between hub user servers and external proxy
    location ~* /(api/kernels/[^/]+/(channels|iopub|shell|stdin)|terminals/websocket)/? {
        proxy_pass https://127.0.0.1:8000;

        proxy_set_header X-Real-IP $remote_addr;
        proxy_set_header Host $host;
        proxy_set_header X-Forwarded-For $proxy_add_x_forwarded_for;
        # WebSocket support
        proxy_http_version 1.1;
        proxy_set_header Upgrade $http_upgrade;
        proxy_set_header Connection $connection_upgrade;

    }

    # Managing requests to verify letsencrypt host
    location ~ /.well-known {
        allow all;
    }


}

nginx will now be the front facing element of JupyterHub on 443 which means it is also free to bind other servers, like NO_HUB.DOMAIN.TLD to the same port on the same machine and network interface. In fact, one can simply use the same server blocks as above for NO_HUB and simply add line for the root directory of the site as well as the applicable location call:

server {
    listen 80;
    server_name NO_HUB.DOMAIN.TLD;

    # Tell all requests to port 80 to be 302 redirected to HTTPS
    return 302 https://$host$request_uri;
}

server {
    listen 443;
    ssl on;

    # INSERT OTHER SSL PARAMETERS HERE AS ABOVE

    # Set the appropriate root directory
    root /var/www/html

    # Set URI handling
    location / {
        try_files $uri $uri/ =404;
    }

    # Managing requests to verify letsencrypt host
    location ~ /.well-known {
        allow all;
    }

}

Now just restart nginx, restart the JupyterHub, and enjoy accessing https://HUB.DOMAIN.TLD while serving other content securely on https://NO_HUB.DOMAIN.TLD.